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Working Conditions in Qatar

1. Minimum working conditions

The Labour Law generally requires employers to provide a safe and hygienic working environment for their employees and ensure that appropriate medical support is provided depending on the number of employees and also the subject matter of the work. Where workers are working in inaccessible locations water, food and transport should also be provided. There are additional regulations governing the living conditions in workers’ camps.

2. Salary

There is no minimum wage in Qatar, although the Labour Law does stipulate that the Emir can set one. Some Embassies, eg. Philippine Embassy, are developing and promoting recommended minimum wage policies for their nationals.

3. Maximum working week

The Labour Law provides for a maximum working week of 48 hours, eight hours a day; with Friday being the weekly day of paid rest. In Ramadan this is reduced to a maximum of six hours a day.

4. Overtime

Workers who are not in a position of responsibility, ie. non-mangerial positions, are entitled to a maximum of two hours’ overtime pay a day in accordance with statutory rates, set according to whether overtime is completed on a normal working day, a Friday, during night time or on a public holiday. The actual working hours of a worker should not exceed 10 hours a day if overtime is worked.

5. Leave

Paid annual leave

A worker who has completed one continuous year of service is entitled to annual leave with pay. Workers who have been employed for less than five years will receive no less than three weeks’ annual paid leave and those who have been in service for longer than five years will be entitled to no less than four weeks’ annual paid leave.

Haj leave

A Muslim worker is entitled to leave without pay, not exceeding two weeks, to go to pilgrimage once during the period of his service dependant on how such leave is allocated internally from time to time.

Sickness and Sick Pay

A worker is entitled to sick leave after they have completed three months’ service. A worker will be paid his or her full salary if the sick leave does not exceed two weeks. If the sick leave extends past two weeks then the worker shall be paid half of his or her wage for a further four weeks. Any extension of sick leave beyond this period will be without pay until the worker resumes work, resigns or his or her service is terminated for health reasons. After the twelfth week the employer may terminate the worker’s employment.

For more information, please contact L&E Global.
This information was contributed by Clyde & Co.
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